Seattle included in United States bid to host World Cup

Eight-month host city selection process closes as 18 cities are chosen for inclusion in USA Bid Committee’s official bid book due to FIFA by May 14, 2010.

SEATTLE – The USA Bid Committee announced today that Seattle is one of 18 potential host cities that will be part of its bid to FIFA to host the FIFA World Cup™ in 2018 or 2022.  Two stadiums are currently under consideration by the USA Bid Committee:  Husky Stadium (72,500 seats) and Qwest Field (67,000 seats).  One stadium will be selected by this May.

In addition, four local training sites will be submitted as part of the bid:  the University of Washington soccer stadium, Seattle University soccer stadium, Starfire Sports Complex in Tukwila, and Virginia Mason Athletic Center (Seahawks’ training facility) in Renton.

“Being a host city for the World Cup would be an extraordinary opportunity for Seattle, and we look forward to working with the USA Bid Committee to bring the FIFA World CupTM to the United States” said Ralph Morton, Executive Director for the Seattle Sports Commission.  “We are excited to be a part of the U.S. team and look forward to working with the seventeen other cities to put together a winning bid.”

“The passion and commitment of Seattle soccer fans is matched by Seattle’s tourism community,” said Tom Norwalk, President & CEO of Seattle’s Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Strong community support as well as first-class hotels, facilities and transportation make Seattle a natural choice to host this prestigious event. The World Cup would bring enormous economic impact to the region and international media coverage would strengthen the city’s reputation as a premier sports and tourism destination.”

The USA Bid Committee will submit its bid to FIFA in May 2010.  In December 2010, FIFA will award the host nation for both 2018 and 2022 World Cups.  FIFA and the local organizing committee will then make a final decision on host cities, typically selecting 10 to 12 host cities for the selected country about five years prior to the event (2013 or 2017).

The USA Bid Committee invited 39 American cities to submit proposals last summer.  The City of Seattle submitted a proposal in July, working closely with local government agencies, companies and organizations including the University of Washington, Seattle Sports Commission and Sounders FC.  Seattle was chosen as one of 27 finalists, and a team of Seattle representatives presented to the USA Bid Committee in November.

The FIFA World Cup™ championship is awarded every four years.  The tournament consists of 64 matches, with 32 teams competing for the title over a period of about a month in June and July.  The games are played in 10 to 14 venues, with most venues used for a two- to three-week period.  The World Cup is one of the most widely viewed sporting events in the world and the 1994 FIFA World Cup™ held in the U.S. reported approximately $4 billion in economic impact.

USA Bid Final Cities in Bid Book to FIFA for 2018 and 2022
FIFA World Cup and related stadiums
(In alphabetical order)

Metro Market/City

Stadium

Estimated capacity for FIFA World Cup

Atlanta

Georgia Dome

70,868

Baltimore

M & T Bank Stadium

71,008

Boston

Gillette Stadium

73,393

Dallas

Cowboys Stadium
Cotton Bowl

91,600
89,000

Denver

INVESCO Field

75,165

Houston

Reliant Stadium

76,000

Indianapolis

Lucas Oil Stadium

66,500

Kansas City

Arrowhead Stadium

75,364

Los Angeles

Rose Bowl
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

89,109
93,607

Miami

Land Shark Stadium

80,240

Nashville

LP Field

75,000

New York/N.J.

New Meadowlands Stadium

84,046

Philadelphia

Lincoln Financial Field

69,111

Phoenix/Glendale

University of Phoenix Stadium

71,362

San Diego

Qualcomm Stadium

67,700

Seattle

Qwest Field
Husky Stadium

68,056
72,500

Tampa

Raymond James Stadium

75,000

Washington, D.C.

FedExField

89,690

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